An instructor for the Aerial Delivery and Material Officer Course explains the purpose of ADMOC

The Quartermaster School’s Aerial Delivery and Field Services Department is completing the second stage of a course restructuring pilot that will not only increase the frequency of the training but also make it more transportable to other installations.

An instructor for the Aerial Delivery and Material Officer Course, part of the team conducting the pilot at Fort Bragg, N.C., explains the purpose of ADMOC – enabling students to assume a leadership role and be successful within an aerial delivery unit – and then details how they’re reshaping the training.

The Quartermaster School’s Aerial Delivery and Field Services Department is completing the second stage of a course restructuring pilot that will not only increase the frequency of the training but also make it more transportable to other installations.

Capt. Matthew Zarek, an instructor for the Aerial Delivery and Material Officer Course, is part of the team conducting the pilot at Fort Bragg, N.C. He first explained the purpose of ADMOC – enabling students to assume a leadership role and be successful within an aerial delivery unit – and then detailed how they’re reshaping the training.

“We’re reducing the course length from five weeks and three days to just under four weeks,” he wrote in a summary provided to the Traveller. “This will result in an increase in offered classes at Fort Lee’s Sustainment Center of Excellence as well as giving us the capability to incorporate Military Training Team opportunities without sacrificing primary course content.”

Students who attend ADMOC range from 0-1s to 0-4s from all military branches, he further explained. International officers also frequently enroll in the course. Within the past decade, ADMOC was opened to any logistics qualified officer, not just those from the quartermaster branch.

“We’re projecting a greater than 30 percent increase in course graduate output as a result of these changes,” Zarek said. “That equates to a sizeable increase in the knowledge and capability of aerial delivery throughout the Army and other military services.”

The course will continue to be conducted in four stages – an Aerial Delivery Phase, Pack Phase, Aerial Equipment Repair and a Planning Phase.

“The first three introduce a lot of hands-on training to provide the students a true understanding and appreciation for the job their future Paratroopers will perform,” Zarek elaborated. “It allows the officers to have a better understanding of the man-hours and parachute packing limits per task. It enables them to apply the ‘on-ground-truth factor’ during the latter Planning Phase when they’re working on their culminating projects and must consider man-hours, packing ratios and so-on.”

The Aerial Delivery Phase has transitioned from seven days to three days, Zarek pointed out.  Under ADMOC-21, it will include equipment familiarization and introduce officers to the aerial delivery process and how it relates to conducting assembly line rigging, heavy drop operations, and joint forcible entries.

“The building of Container Delivery System bundles and placing those on type 5 platforms (ROSES) remains intact due to the importance they play in the current and future operational environments,” he added.

The now half-day Aerial Equipment Repair phase familiarizes students with the MC-6 parachute maintenance process, which involves a technical rigger inspection and thoroughly annotating deficiencies on a DD Form 2404. Students also learn how parachutes can be repaired on in-house sewing equipment.

“Again, these are all man-hour and readiness factors,” Zarek reiterated.

The Pack Phase will “remain intact, for the most part,” he continued. The reason is due to the amount of time it takes for a student to go from witnessing the instructor perform a pack demonstration to readying an MC-6 parachute themselves within one hour. Students who receive a “go” for that demanding task will, if available, participate in an airborne operation and jump with their own packed parachute.

“Students will complete a basic airborne refresher course at the end of this phase to prepare them for performing airborne operations with an MC-6 parachute,” Zarek said.

The Planning Phase encompasses everything students were taught during the hands-on portion of the course and ties it into operating a rigging facility or as a staff officer providing support for aerial delivery missions. During this phase, students are now educated on rigger unit compositions, malfunction officer duties, aerial delivery, assembly line rigging, air resupply doctrine and more.

“The planning phase includes a Fort Bragg tour where students observe multiple rigger facilities (from the 82D Airborne Division to 3rd Special Forces Group) to understand how different sized units organize their parachute facilities and manage their missions,” Zarek said.

This material provides them a foundation on aerial delivery and prepares them for the last two culminating projects: managing a parachute pack cycle and supporting large-scale combat operations through JFEs. Students learn how to manage a platoon-size rigger element in support of airborne operations through 90 days for an Infantry Brigade Combat Team. The second project teaches students in small groups, from the company-to-brigade level, everything involved in supporting multiple JFEs from an aerial delivery perspective using the Military Decision Making Process.

“I am so proud to be part of this restructuring pilot and a member of the first ADMOC MTT course in ADFSD history,” Zarek concluded. “The expansion of students; the consolidation of course curriculum; and the capability to conduct this training via MTT and perform classroom instruction virtually with MS Teams is a testament to how our department is adapting to the current and future operational environment. The skills learned from this phase, and the entire course, ensure our leaders are ready to take on any level aerial delivery mission throughout the armed forces.”