FORT LEE, Va. (July 23, 2009) – In May 1989, Fort Lee awarded the first Job Order Contracting contract.

This was in direct response to the Army’s test case with five other installations of this new construction contracting tool designed to streamline the procurement process and eliminate red tape. Additionally, the process increased incentives to the contractor to perform, reduced time and cost, and increased quality.

The first year in business, the Fort Lee JOC awarded 19 projects valued at $583,000. This was a big deal 20 years ago, but to see real evolution of this program, JOC grew to 38 projects valued at $11.2 million in 2008.

Completing 20 years in business, the Directorate of Public Works and Logistics awarded its 711th JOC project bringing the total construction awarded under the JOC program since its inception to $73.73 million.

Even better news is Fort Lee has benefited from more than $25 million in total savings by using JOC over the other traditional construction contracting methods during those 20 years.

Not a bad discount.

The JOC contract is different from standard construction contracts in that one umbrella construction contract is awarded with multiple option years. The Fort Lee JOC Branch then develops and designs projects for construction, and awards them as task orders on the prime contract to one general contractor.

TThere is more control over the design and construction processes, and the JOC project managers remain with each project from the concept stage to turning the keys over – a cradle to grave project management system. The process also eliminates many of the procurement fees, engineering review processes, and the supervision and administrative fees associated with standard construction projects. In 20 years, the elimination of those fees and expenses has amounted to more than a $25M savings for Fort Lee, which has financed even more construction projects.

The JOC program began development at Fort Lee at the end of the Army’s test program in 1988. The first contract was awarded in mid 1989. The program was an instant success, realizing 30% time savings over traditional methods, as well as real dollar savings per project without the traditional process fees. Fort Lee was soon recognized as the model JOC program in the Army and invited as guest speaker at the Worldwide DPW conference in Baltimore and Dallas.

The JOC program is also one of the few contracting methods that offers incentive to both the government and the contractor for success. The option years are truly options and if a contractor does not perform, the option year is not exercised and the contract terminated. However, if the contractor performs well, successive option years can be awarded, thus allowing a high performer to remain on post for several years executing construction projects across the installation.

JOC projects have covered every conceivable venue – from new construction to renovation; from environmental to roadways; from utility systems to post wide landscaping; from hurricane reconstruction to emergency generators. And just about every organization on the installation has experienced a JOC project. The amount of reimbursable work received (IE paid for by the customer when DPW does not have funding) speaks well for JOC with several million last year alone – a win-win situation.

Fort Lee was a founding member of the Department of the Army JOC Steering Committee, chartered by (2) Assistant Secretaries of the Army; and has enjoyed membership over the years on the Executive Committee, Policy Committee, Automation Committee and Training Committee.

Fort Lee’s JOC progressed with the program, often on the forefront of developing new standards, processes, software and AFARs (Army Federal Acquisition Regulations), as well as penning a project manager’s handbook sent to over 100 Army installations. Additionally, Fort Lee helped develop and test the first formal, Army-wide training courses for JOC.

The JOC business is self-perpetuating in that it is customer focused - and they keep coming back. Customer service and teamwork are ingrained in the JOC process.

Successively, the JOC Chiefs Jim Furr, Mike Sly and Brad Hill have represented Fort Lee and the Army, steering the direction of this important construction program for Army installations, which now collectively spend more than $1B annually in the JOC program.

The current JOC team is composed of Brad Hill, Maurice Singleton, Paul Murray, Wayne Temple, Shawn Shelton, Willie York (and until a recent promotion – Frieda Dawes). This dedicated team provides supervision, administration, contracting oversight, design, construction and project management functions for a complete, full-service construction branch of the Engineering Division. The JOC program is a valuable tool contributing to Fort Lee’s massive construction program, as we crest the $1B mark under construction for the greatest installation construction program in history.

This saves having to develop a new construction contract, specifications, formal design, etc. each time a new construction contract is awarded as required utilizing traditional methods.

There is more control over the design and construction processes, and the JOC project managers remain with each project from the concept stage to turning the keys over – a cradle to grave project management system.

The process also eliminates many of the procurement fees, engineering review processes, and the supervision and administrative fees associated with standard construction projects. In 20 years, the elimination of those fees and expenses has amounted to more than a $25 million savings for Fort Lee, which has financed even more construction projects.

The JOC program began development at Fort Lee at the end of the Army’s test program in 1988. The first contract was awarded in mid 1989. The program was an instant success, realizing 30 percent time savings over traditional methods, as well as real dollar savings per project without the traditional process fees. Fort Lee was soon recognized as the model JOC program in the Army and invited as guest speaker at the Worldwide DPW conference in Baltimore and Dallas.

The JOC program is also one of the few contracting methods that offers incentive to both the government and the contractor for success. The option years are truly options and if a contractor does not perform, the option year is not exercised and the contract terminated. However, if the contractor performs well, successive option years can be awarded, thus allowing a high performer to remain on post for several years executing construction projects across the installation.

JOC projects have covered every conceivable venue – from new construction to renovation; from environmental to roadways; from utility systems to post wide landscaping; from hurricane reconstruction to emergency generators. And just about every organization on the installation has experienced a JOC project. The amount of reimbursable work received (for example, paid for by the customer when DPW does not have funding) speaks well for JOC with several million last year alone – a win-win situation.

Fort Lee was a founding member of the Department of the Army JOC Steering Committee, chartered by two Assistant Secretaries of the Army; and has enjoyed membership over the years on the Executive Committee, Policy Committee, Automation Committee and Training Committee.

Fort Lee’s JOC progressed with the program, often on the forefront of developing new standards, processes, software and Army Federal Acquisition Regulations, as well as penning a project manager’s handbook sent to over 100 Army installations. Additionally, Fort Lee helped develop and test the first formal, Army-wide training courses for JOC.

The JOC business is self-perpetuating in that it is customer focused – and they keep coming back. Customer service and teamwork are ingrained in the JOC process.

Successively, the JOC Chiefs Jim Furr, Mike Sly and Brad Hill have represented Fort Lee and the Army, steering the direction of this important construction program for Army installations, which now collectively spend more than $1 billion annually in the JOC program.

The current JOC team is composed of Brad Hill, Maurice Singleton, Paul Murray, Wayne Temple, Shawn Shelton, Willie York (and until a recent promotion – Frieda Dawes). This dedicated team provides supervision, administration, contracting oversight, design, construction and project management functions for a complete, full-service construction branch of the Engineering Division. The JOC program is a valuable tool contributing to Fort Lee’s massive construction program, as we crest the $1 billion mark under construction for the greatest installation construction program in history.